KNOWLEDGE TO SHARE

Dr. Shanshan Wang believes in the power of knowledge. On top of being an art collector and dealer, she is also an educator. Through her monthly Art Salon and writings, she shares her knowledge and expertise to understand our collections and Asian antiquities in general. We publish her study articles and reports before every major exhibition to cultivate and promote knowledge of Asian art among all our enthusiasts.

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CONTEMPORARY KOREAN CERAMICS

The contemporary, quirky-looking Korean ceramics, created by a Korean artist Yun Jucheol, are deeply routed in traditional Korean techniques, derived from the gwiyal method while making buncheong wares. By understanding the traditions of Korean ceramic technique, one is able to truly appreciate the sophistication and beauty of this modern design.

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REVIEW OF XUANDE AND CHENGHUA BLUE-WHITE PORCELAINS

How do you tell the difference between blue-and-white porcelains from the Xuande and Chenghua reigns, which are both extremely well known? The key can be found by delving into their chemistry, where the composition of cobalt ore used to create blue pigments can date the items. This report examines the fusion between art, culture and science through the lens of these fascinating ceramics.

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KOREAN GORYEO DYNASTY CELADONS

The unique aesthetic of the Goryeo dynasty (918-1392 CE) Korean celadons has engendered a worldwide following. How did this evolve? This report explores this through an analysis of the changing nature of maebyeong wine vessels from the period. Embedded in this evolution are echoes of history so strong that the items themselves seem to resonate with the energy of the time.

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TANG DYNASTY WESTERN ASIAN DANCING BOY POTTERY

This lively, curly-haired dancing boy pottery figure was made during the Tang dynasty (618-907 AD). Who were the foreigners in China at that time? The discovery of Kunluns figures help unveil the picture of globalisation and cultural impacts in the Tang dynasty, which had stretched across continents.

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EARLY CHINESE POTTERY, PART I

This research article accompanies the opening of the inaugural exhibition "Tastes of the Ancient Eras". The discovery of early Chinese pottery occurred barely one century ago and therefore many unknowns remain: what the pots were used for, how they were made, what the different patterns signify, etc.